Expert Eye: Retro Diner

STYLIST JULIA GREEN BRINGS THE PATTERNED EUPHORIA OF THE 1970S TO THE DINING TABLE.

THE 70s HAD IT ALL. The unbridled use of colour and pattern throughout the decade made it an unforgettable era – and one that has had a heavy influence on our current trends. Bold hues were introduced and retro patterns made a bohemian statement. As a child of the 70s, I can recall lively conversations around the dining table; it was a revolutionary time not just for interiors but for women’s rights. It was as if the colours of the time set the scene for the positive changes ahead. And to see them make a glamorous comeback within contemporary living spaces brings back happy memories of change and the strength it brought with it.

Retro is back in style and the use of texture and contrast is now more present than ever. For instance, you may find a bold mustard floral wallpaper paired with velvet-covered dining chairs and a flokati rug, and this very mix of colour and texture is what will bring back the 70s in a sophisticated yet modern way. Here’s how to recreate the time-travelling look within your own kitchen.

Styling by Julia Green and Noél Coughlan. Photography by Armelle Habib.

Styling by Julia Green and Noél Coughlan. Photography by Armelle Habib.

TOUCHABLE LAYERS

Shagpile is definitely a word that springs to mind when it comes to the 70s. But these days, the texture that carpet brings to a room has been replaced with highly tactile wall hangings, faux fur and soft furnishings. These touchable layers make a space cosy, relaxed and lived in.

Styling by Julia Green and Noél Coughlan. Photography by Armelle Habib.

Styling by Julia Green and Noél Coughlan. Photography by Armelle Habib.

EXPERIMENTAL PATTERNS

The years of the 70s brought with them wild wallpapers that told flamboyant stories about the homeowners that lived with them. People experimented not only with colour but with pattern on the walls – and to great effect. From oversized florals to retro patterns, wallpaper set the mood of the space and dictated the palette of the home as a whole.

Styling by Julia Green and Noél Coughlan. Photography by Armelle Habib.

Styling by Julia Green and Noél Coughlan. Photography by Armelle Habib.

RELAXED DESIGN

The stiff upper lip of the 60s went out the window once the 70s rolled around, and this became evident within interior design. Relaxed spaces became the norm, rather than impeccably manicured ones. Beds became layered with texture and pattern, record players littered the floor, and a lived-in, rockstar vibe took over from the polished perfection of the previous decade.

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