TOAF Melbourne Q + A: Amanda Krantz

THE FLUID AND FANTASTICAL PAINTINGS OF AMANDA KRANTZ ARE BEST DESCRIBED AS ORGANIC PSYCHEDELIA.

Where do you create your fantastical pieces?

I’m based in North Melbourne, not far from the famous Queen Victoria Markets. Although my work is about as far away from ‘urban’ as you could go, I find I’m drawn to the energy of large cities. Melbourne especially with its diverse culture and food. It seems to keep me excited about the world we live in, and excited to travel and explore. And then there are the practical reasons for running a creative business in the inner-city: it’s easy to get whatever you need in a jiffy.

Can you describe your studio?

I’m one of the fortunate few that have a live-in studio – that is, I have a bed, kitchen and bathroom in the workspace. Emphasis on the workspace, as opposed to a home with a workspace. It’s a hidden space down a laneway, and I enjoy that quiet and private aspect. Often I listen to modern classical music while working, or if I’m working on something that requires less concentration – such as prepping canvases or repetitive details – I’ll opt for a podcast or an audiobook.

What does a typical day look like?

I’m usually awake by 6am and spend the initial couple of hours watching YouTube channels and reading the news with a cup of coffee. Then I’ll meditate for 15 minutes, clean up and plan the day. In general, I tend to care of emails, orders and deliveries in the morning – as well as a trip to the market for food – and do most of my painting in the afternoon. I’ll finish around 5.30pm with a whiskey and a phone call with my long-distance girlfriend. It’s probably a more leisurely day than most people, but then I generally don’t have weekends. It’s more of a combined work-and-life type life.

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