Q + A: Kathryn Lewis

INSPIRED BY THE HIDDEN ENVIRONMENTS OF WILDLIFE IN WESTERN NEW SOUTH WALES, KATHRYN LEWIS CREATES COMPLEX GARDEN LANDSCAPES AND STILL LIFES.

What materials do you use?

I am in love with oils. They are forgiving but also give you more time to mould your ideas. I love the buttery feeling and I often work with palette knifes. The colour is alsomore vivid and crisp.

What is your process?

I begin with my sketches – many, many sketches – which lead me to what I am going say and then put to canvas. I don’t plan too much at the painting stage, except for the colours I am looking for, as this is the beginning of my creative journey. I know what I want to say about the goanna who invaded the orchard and eyeballed the chicken!

What have you been working on recently?

I have just finished an exhibition built on a Ray Turner approach to painting a cross section of people within the local community in a rural New South Wales town. Again, the subject is painted in a loose fluid movement, similar to my garden scenes. I am also working on a commission of flowers. Beautiful.

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