Q+A: Anika Kirk

THE COLOURFUL, WHIMSICAL SUBJECTS OF ANIKA KIRK’S WORK EVOKE A SENSE OF CURIOSITY AND WONDER.

How would you describe your style?

I tend to toggle between two art styles – one being the loose and relaxed brush strokes when I paint, in contrast with the fine detail I enjoy while illustrating. Putting aside the vast differences of these two art styles, my art can be recognised by my pastel colour palette and somewhat whimsical subjects.

When did you find yourself falling in love with art?

Both my parents are very creative, so I think it’s definitely in my blood. My earliest memory is of my mum sitting me down on the balcony with various art supplies – I would quite happily sit there for hours entertaining myself. Not much has changed!

When do you feel your most creative?

The later at night the better. For some reason I have this notion that creativity for me only really happens after midnight. Once I’m on a roll I can paint or draw for hours, getting so lost in the zone, creativity flows from my delirious subconscious. It’s a struggle to put the pencil down and get to bed!

What is the atmosphere in your studio?

My studio space is filled with all things I love. Cute, kitsch and colourful! It really helps for me to be able to create in an inspiring space. Music is a must! Oh, and cups of tea. Always lots of tea!

When do you find yourself inspired?

Ideas for a work will just come to me at the most random of times. I get a vision of how the piece will look, and a feeling I want to portray. Because of this I always make sure to carry a mini sketch book so I can quickly sketch up the idea as soon as I think of it. If I don’t do that, sometimes I can’t visualise it as clearly again and that idea is lost forever. I may have a number of these ideas sketched up at any one time, just waiting for the right time put the actual piece together.

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