Q + A: Tricia Trinder

TRICIA TRINDER USES BEESWAX, DAMAR RESIN AND DRY PIGMENT TO CREATE HER ATMOSPHERIC PAINTINGS DEPICTING THE OCEAN HORIZON.

How long have you been an artist?

I have sketched and painted all my life, but in the last 10 years I have explored the encaustic [wax] medium alongside my normal practice. Two years ago, I worked on building a body of work and last year had my first solo exhibition at Sydney Road Gallery.

What have you been working on lately?

I’m still exploring my Horizon theme. I love creating the light on the horizon, and the different colours that can be seen in the water; the textures of the waves. All cre- ated just using my hands and polished to an amazing shine. People are always sur- prised that my work is created using wax.

What is your studio like?

My studio is an organised mess where everything is covered in a fine film of blue pigment, including me at the end of the day! It’s in a well-ventilated converted shed at the bottom of my garden, which is covered in wisteria. I like to play loud mu- sic whilst I work, which helps me focus on what I’m doing.

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