Q + A: Claire Cavanna

CLAIRE CAVANNA’S TRANQUIL CONCEPTUAL LANDSCAPES CREATE EVOCATIVE MOMENTS THAT DEMAND CLOSER INSPECTION.

Tell us about your process?

Initially, I go out into the local bushland and photograph areas that I think will make an interesting subject. I look for shapes rather than light or shadows. I make notes of the colours and shapes I’m interested in. When I return to the studio, I make small waterc- olour sketches on paper and then scale up onto linen or canvas using an acrylic base, finishing with oil paint. If I’m satisfied with the composition, I will then transcribe to a larger stretched linen or canvas to create the final piece.

Sometimes, I will transcribe the small watercolour sketch onto a large sheet of
stretched watercolour paper and once completed, I will remove the work from the
stretcher and have it framed under glass.

How do you work best?

I always work with music playing through my headset, that way I know I won’t be dis- turbed. I listen to chamber music or electron- ic music, as I find both have a structure and tone that is similar to my work and aids my creative process.

What do you aim to achieve through your art?

My aim is to provide a quiet space for reflection, while adding beauty to our tumultuous world.

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