Best of Sculpture: Peter Kovacsy

ART EDIT PRESENTS A SELECTION OF SCULPTORS AT THE TOP OF THEIR GAME. KIRSTY SIER WRITES.

Majestic in their own right, the sculptures of Western Australian artist Peter Kovacsy are enhanced by company. The abstract forms – meticulously moulded out of cast glass, timber or metal – reference nature and respond to the movement of light. After casting his materials into geometric blocks and long, smooth arches, Peter smooths these towering structures until they glow as the sun catches their laboriously sculpted edges and surprising embedded details. From start to finish, these sculptures take at least six months to make, and can weigh anywhere between one and 80 kilograms.

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