Best of Sculpture: Peter Day

ART EDIT PRESENTS A SELECTION OF SCULPTORS AT THE TOP OF THEIR GAME. KIRSTY SIER WRITES.

There is a magic to the sculpture of Peter Day; the kind that comes from seeing everyday objects in a new light. Calling to mind the irreverent attitude of the Dada movement’s ready-mades, the artist’s work is subtly inspired by sculptors such as Ken Reinhard and Ron Robertson-Swann – although his current work is not immediately similar to either. In Peter’s hands, bedside tables become objects of historical enquiry, lengths of rope levitate of their own accord and bronze disguises itself as discarded tree branches. The artist first started sculpting in the 1970s as a student at the National Art School, Sydney, with a mission to create objects that hadn’t existed before – and in the intervening decades, he has succeeded.

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