Best of Sculpture: Betty Collier

ART EDIT PRESENTS A SELECTION OF SCULPTORS AT THE TOP OF THEIR GAME. KIRSTY SIER WRITES.

As a self-described “outdoor person”, artist Betty Collier takes cues from all aspects of nature to create her work – both subject matter and media. In her formative years, the artist looked to contemporaries such as Barbara Hepworth and Henry Moore for their rejection of the figurative history of art; rather, they worked in materials that Betty could relate to. These days, Betty lets the shape and size of her materials dictate the sculpture – for instance, pieces of Huon pine, alabaster stone, Pilbara jade and Mount Gambier limestone. The semi-representational figures that are produced from this diverse material palette are always entirely unique as a result of the artist’s refusal to be defined by any one approach – but that’s not to say that the artist doesn’t leave her mark. Each of Betty’s works is hand-finished to create the tactile, curvilinear forms that she has become known for.

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